Wednesday, May 27, 2020

Banjul Disaster Coordinator Outlines Plans to Curb Disaster

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By Sailu Bah The Gambia’s capital, Banjul is prone to disasters especially during the Hudul E.N. Colleyrainy season when floods occur. Foroyaa interviewed Mr.Hudul Colley, the Disaster Coordinator for Banjul to shed light on the plans they have to mitigate those problems that occur due mainly to disasters in Banjul. Mr. Hudul said when a disaster strikes, there would be chaos if there are no possible measures or strategies in place. “We don’t have capacities to map out all resources or hazards within the community. We try to create awareness for the community on how to respond to disaster and what strategies to put in place in order to mitigate disaster risks,” explained Hudul. The Disaster Management Coordinator for Banjul said Banjul should be a great concern because Banjul itself is prone to floods. He said a rise of one metre of sea level will cause a great disaster in Banjul. He cited Campama ward in Tobacco road as the most prone to floods in Banjul because it is closest to the swamps. Colley said they have put in place strategies in order to avoid floods in that area. He said that the drainage system is built in a systematic way, that the water from the community enters the Primary drainage through the Secondary Drainage to the Main Ring Canal and then to the river. He said this is how waste water is transported within Banjul. He said this drainage system has been built since colonial times when Banjul once experienced a big flood around 1949. Mr Colley informs that a lot of resources have been spent to open the drainage outlets in order to remove the blockages in the drains to allow easy flow of water through it. He however said the drainages are littered by the people who are in the community themselves, the same people who are vulnerable to disaster. Colley took the opportunity to urge the community to change their attitude and take proper care of the drainage system to avoid disasters.]]>

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